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On 10/02/2015
...This cool factor is what drove automakers to tweak those three boring colors with metallic and pearlized finishes.

The Boring Colors

Last weekend I was patiently waiting in my silver car at a red light, when I noticed two silver cars and one white one to my right. There was also one silver car and a white truck to left. Approaching in the distance were two white vans. In my rear view mirror I noticed a black truck had joined this color-fest. What an exciting bunch of people! Black, white and silver cars were everywhere you look, but wait, wait – just wait one minute, before the light changed to green. Some goofball showed up in a burgundy car and ruined the whole bland vibe! Burgundy, huh? Who was this burgundy car driver, where did he get off blazing this color trail in my hometown? Was it Mr. Excitement, an interior designer perhaps, a painter or a trend blogger? Nope, just an everyday SUV-driving soccer mom!

Monday morning I pulled into the Grand Rapids office parking lot, this is the place where the Spradling International Marine color specialists, the people that bring all the cool, exciting, high-energy vinyl colors to the Marine industry, park their transportation devices. I took a look around, and wow! Six vehicles sat there, four were black, one was silver, and one was charcoal. I, of course, was in my silver Jeep. For the record, I do have a Dark Green Yukon, but that is just because the Michigan State Spartans Rule!

Why so many boring white, black and silver cars?

Several years ago, while attending a design association gathering with Color Marketing Group (CMG), a designer from Toyota told me why. She stated that people want a safe color, one that will resell, but they also want something cool. This cool factor is what drove automakers to tweak those three boring colors with metallic and pearlized finishes. Another reason is that there is a direct correlation between the price and the color. Anyone can buy a bright colored shirt for $20.00, wear it a few times, and send it to Goodwill. A car is much more of a financial commitment – one that you don’t want to be out of style next Spring!

 

Sea ya,

Bryan