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On 09/12/2016
Marrying the craftsman’s movement and love of all things handmade with technology creates designs and products that were previously unimaginable.

Materials + Technology + Craft

Trend Union is one of the world’s leading prognosticators of all things design. I recently attended Trend Union’s NYC trend presentation.

Below is an excerpt of some of the featured trends from the presentation:

New Materialism & Matter—The combination of technology and handcrafting = amazing hybrid materials that merge into new concepts and forms. Marrying the craftsman’s movement and love of all things handmade with technology creates designs and products that were previously unimaginable.

Working wood—Martin Bast collaborated with New Window and utilized wood—sliced thinly, which gave it a comb-like effect—as a shutter look for a window. The uniqueness is that it is cut into the door as one piece. 

Powdering Pulp—How can we reuse the waste from wood, a precious natural material? Marjan van Aubel uses recycled wood shavings combined with bio resin to form her stunning pieces. Her process of molding the material leaves the bubbly combination of the two materials exposed on the surface au naturel (as seen above in Well Proven Chair). 

Throwing Earth—Olivier van Herpt re-envisions clay by using a 3D printer to create functional and decorative objects.  Amazing forms that resemble stalactites, honeycombs, wood and other organic textures are incredible architectural elements that bring life to his functional ceramics.

Solar Sintering—Markus Kayser has elevated the concept of new materialism. As a response to the concerns of how raw material shortages will effect manufacturing, Kayser utilizes two seemingly unlimited resources, sun and sand from the desert, to produce glass objects in his solar-powered laser 3D printer. His ideas could have a huge impact on the future of manufacturing and the utilization of Earth’s natural resources.

Thread-wrapping—Inspired by graffiti to take thread scraps and wrap all kinds objects, Anton Alvarez is asking us to reassess what is design today. He turns ordinary chairs into objects of art.  He also utilizes carpet scraps by sewing them together with thread.

Forging the Future— Forging is recovering wasted metals and reusing them via urban mining of scraps and leftovers. Designers melt the metals and recast them as organic shapes.